By Jennifer T. Roberts

"Tracing the clash one of the city-states of Greece over a number of generations, this publication argues that the Peloponnesian struggle didn't solely lead to 404 with the catch of the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami in 404 B.C. yet fairly endured in a single shape or one other good into the fourth century"--Provided by way of publisher.

summary: "Tracing the clash one of the city-states of Greece over numerous generations, this booklet argues that the Peloponnesian struggle didn't totally lead to 404 with the seize of the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami in 404 B.C. yet really persisted in a single shape or one other good into the fourth century"--Provided by way of writer

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13 A relative of Thucydides, the persuasive Miltiades went down in history as the hero of this great battle. 13.  5. 21 The Plague of War Hoplite battle was terrifying under the best of circumstances—​the difficulty of seeing through the helmet, the insufferable heat inside the armor (quite possibly complicated by the hot urine and excrement of the petrified soldier), the clanging of weapons, the slippery ground soaked with blood, the choking dust everywhere, the groans of the dead and the dying.

It is telling, however, that the Spartans should have called a meeting of their allies to discuss the matter of aid to Samos in the first place. The balance between war and peace was plainly delicate, but it would be a mistake to assume that the Athenians and the Spartans were by nature so mired in rivalry, so wedded to status, so skittish about the slenderest slight to honor that they were compelled to enter on the bloodbath that erupted in 431 and continued (with some interruption) for decades.

Meanwhile in Athens, Archidamus’s opposite number Pericles, son of Xanthippus and Agariste (thus a member of the illustrious Alcmaeonid family on his mother’s side), was having things very much his own way. It was ironic that Pericles should have been able to control policy in Athens more effectively than Archidamus could in Sparta, since not only was he no king, and unable to trace his lineage to any god, but he was not even the chief executive. Athens had no chief executive; rather, ultimate authority lay with its voluble assembly, which, unlike the assembly at Sparta, debated vigorously as well as voting.

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